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Friday, April 28, 2017

Three Videos Of Little Girls Dancing To American Hip Hop Songs With Their Big Sister/s

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases three videos of little girls dancing to American Hip Hop songs with their big sister/s.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

Click the tags given below for other pancocojams posts about the featured Hip Hop songs/dances.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: Cutest #HitTheQuan Ever



shervon king, Published on Aug 12, 2015

Little girl is the cutest dancing to Hit The Quan

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Example #2: Petty song



Siandre Bunkley Published on Jun 17, 2016


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Example #3: Best "Juju On That Beat" Dance by 8 year old



YoRodney Published on Oct 23, 2016

these little girls was doing the dance to the Juju song . . peep the little one in the back she didn't want to get counted out , like the video if it's the best one by a kid

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Names For Days Of The Week In Soninke & Wolof

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about names for days of the week in Soninke and Wolof. Soninke and Wolof are two traditional West African languages.

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series that provides information about and lists for day names in various African languages. Click the "African languages days of the week" tag to find other posts in this ongoing series.

The content of this post is presented for linguistic, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/09/excerpts-from-two-articles-by-fallou.html for a related pancocojams post entitled "Excerpts From Two Articles By Fallou Ngom About The Use Of French, Arabic, English, & Pulaar Loanwords In Senegal's Wolof Language"

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GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT SONINKE (LANGUAGE)
Excerpt #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soninke_language
"The Soninke language (Soninke: Sooninkanxanne[3]) is a Mande language spoken by the Soninke people of West Africa. The language has an estimated 1,096,795 speakers, primarily located in Mali, and also (in order of numerical importance of the communities) in Senegal, Ivory Coast, The Gambia, Mauritania, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Ghana. It enjoys the status of a national language in Mali, Senegal, and Mauritania.
The language is relatively homogeneous, with only slight phonological, lexical, and grammatical variations."...

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Excerpt #2:
From https://www.alsintl.com/resources/languages/Soninke/
"Soninke Language

Soninke (also called Marka, Maraka, Sarakole, Sarakule, Sarawule, Serahuli, Silabe, Toubakai, Wakore, Gadyaga, Aswanik, Diawara) is a Mande language of the Niger-Congo language family. It is the national language of Mali. Soninke is also spoken in Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania, and Senegal.

There are more than one million Soninke speakers worldwide.

Soninke dialects include Azer (Adjer, Aser), Kinbakka, and Xenqenna."...

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Excerpt #3
From http://files.peacecorps.gov/multimedia/audio/languagelessons/mauritania/MR_Soninke_Language_Lessons.pdf
Days Of The Week [in Soninke]
Tineeni Monday
Talaata Tuesday
Araba Wednesday
Alaxamisa Thursday
Al juma Friday
Sibiti Saturday
Alahadi Sunday
Koota su Every day

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GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT WOLOF
Excerpt #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolof_language
Wolof ... is a language of Senegal, the Gambia, and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people. Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family. Unlike most other languages of Sub-Saharan Africa, Wolof is not a tonal language.

Wolof originated as the language of the Lebu people.[3][4] It is the most widely spoken language in Senegal, spoken natively by the Wolof people (40% of the population) but also by most other Senegalese as a second language.

Wolof dialects vary geographically and between rural and urban areas. "Dakar-Wolof", for instance, is an urban mixture of Wolof, French, and Arabic.

"Wolof" is the standard spelling and may refer to the Wolof people or to Wolof culture. Variants include the older French Ouolof and the principally Gambian "Wollof". "Jolof", "jollof", etc., now typically refers either to the Jolof Empire or to jollof rice, a common West African rice dish. Now-archaic forms include "Volof" and "Olof".

The English language is believed to have adopted some Wolof words, such as banana, via Spanish or Portuguese,[5] and yum/yummy, from Wolof nyam "to taste";[6] nyam in Barbadian English[7] meaning "to eat" (also compare Seychellois Creole nyanmnyanm, also meaning "to eat").[8]

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Excerpt #2
From http://www.omniglot.com/writing/wolof.htm
"Wolof (Wollof)

Wolof is a member of the Senegambian branch of the Niger-Congo language family with about 7 million speakers in Senegal, France, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali and Mauritania. Wolof is one of the six national languages of Senegal (Senegaal / سِنِڭَالْ), along with Serer, Mandinka, Pulaar, Diola and Soninke.

Wolof was first written with a version of the Arabic script known as Wolofal, which is still used by many older men in Senegal. The Wolof orthography using the Latin alphabet was standardised in 1974 and is the official script for Wolof in Senegal.

Wolof is also sometimes written with the Garay alphabet which was devised by Assane Faye, a Senegalese artist, in 1961. This alphabet is written from right to left and is modelled loosely on the Arabic script."...

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Excerpt #3
From DAYS OF THE WEEK / BÉSI AYUBÉS BI
From https://jangawolof.wordpress.com/2007/12/27/days-of-the-week-besi-ayubes-bi/
December 27, 2007 by Amadou
"Wolof names for the days of the week are mostly adopted from Arabic.:

[...]

Monday – Alteneh / Altinay / Altine [al-ti-ney]
Tuesday – Talarta / Talata / Talaata [ta-laa-ta]
Wednesday – Arlahrba / Alarba / Àllarba [al-lar-ba]
Thursday – Alheames / Alxamess / Alxames [al-kha-mes]
Friday – Arjuma / Ajuma / Àjjuma [aj-ju-ma]
Saturday – Gaaw / Gaawo / Gaawu [gaa-woo]
Sunday – Dibéér / Dibeer / Dibéer [dee-beyr]

Saturday may also be known as Aséér. (found this trans. in a Gambian source)"

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Help please! While I've found online information about Serer (Serer-Sine), I've not been able to find any internet list of the names for the days of the week in that language. Please add to online information about traditional African languages by sharing the names for the days of the week in Serer in the discussion thread of this post. Thanks!

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Names For Days Of The Week In Three Mande Languages: Bambara, Jula, and Mandinka

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about names for days of the week in three Mande languages: Bambara, Jula (Dioula), and Mandinka.

"Mande" is a category for some-but not all- traditional languages that are spoken in West Africa.

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series that provides information about and lists for day names in various African languages. Click the "African languages days of the week" tag to find other posts in this ongoing series.

The content of this post is presented for linguistic, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

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GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT MANDE (LANGUAGES CATEGORY)
Excerpt #1:
From http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199772810/obo-9780199772810-0144.xml
"Mande Languages", Dmitry Idiatov, Last Modified 11 January 2017
"Introduction

Mande languages are spoken across much of inland West Africa up to the northwest of Nigeria as their eastern limit. The center of gravity of the Mande-speaking world is situated in the southwest of Mali and the neighboring regions. There are approximately seventy Mande languages. Mande languages have long been recognized as a coherent group. Thanks to both a sufficient number of clear lexical correspondences and the remarkable uniformity in basic morphosyntax, the attribution of a given language to Mande is usually straightforward. The major subdivision within Mande is between Western Mande, which comprises the majority of both languages and speakers, and Southeastern Mande (aka Southern Mande or Eastern Mande, which are also the names for the two subbranches of Southeastern Mande), a comparatively small but linguistically diverse and geographically dispersed group.

Traditionally, Mande languages have been classified as one of the earliest offshoots of Niger-Congo. However, their external affiliation still remains a working hypothesis rather than an established fact. One of the most well-known Mande languages is probably Bamana (aka Bambara), as well as some of its close relatives, which in nonlinguistic publications are sometimes indiscriminately referred to as Mandingo. Mande languages are written in a variety of scripts ranging from Latin-based or Arabic-based alphabets to indigenously developed scripts, both syllabic and alphabetic."
-snip-
This article has been reformatted for this post.

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Excerpt #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mande_languages
"The Mande languages are spoken in several countries in West Africa by the Mandé people and include Mandinka, Soninke, Bambara, Dioula, Bozo, Mende, Susu, and Vai. There are millions of speakers, chiefly in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Ivory Coast. The Mande languages have traditionally been considered a divergent branch of the Niger–Congo family, but that has always been controversial.”...

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INFORMATION ABOUT & NAMES OF DAYS OF THE WEEK IN BAMBARA, JULA, AND MANDINKA
Bambara
Excerpt #1:
From http://www.omniglot.com/writing/bambara.htm
"Bambara (Bamanankan)

Bambara is a Mande language with about 3 million speakers in Mali, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire, Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Ghana. It is spoken principally among the Bambara ethnic group in Mali, where it is the national language and the most widely understood one.

Writing was introduced to the Bambara during the French occupation (1880-1960) and Bambara is usually written with the Latin alphabet, though the N'Ko and Arabic alphabets are also used to some extent. In addition, there is a rich oral literature, consisting largely of tales of kings and heroes."...

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Excerpt #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bambara_language
"The Bambara (Bamana) language, Bamanankan, is a lingua franca and national language of Mali spoken by perhaps 15 million people, 5 million Bambara people and about 10 million second-language users. It is estimated that about 80 percent of the population of Mali speak Bambara as a first or second language. It has a subject–object–verb clause structure and two lexical tones.

Classification
Bambara is a variety of a group of closely related languages called Manding, whose native speakers trace their cultural history to the medieval Mali Empire.[3] Varieties of Manding are generally considered (among native speakers) to be mutually intelligible – dependent on exposure or familiarity with dialects between speakers – and spoken by 30 to 40 million people in the countries Burkina Faso, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Liberia, Ivory Coast and the Gambia.[4] Manding is part of the larger Mandé family of languages."...

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Excerpt #3
http://wikitravel.org/en/Bambara_phrasebook http://wikitravel.org/en/Bambara_phrasebook
Bambara phrasebook, Mali Banner.jpg
"Bambara, or Bamanankan is a language in West Africa, mostly in Mali, where it is mother tongue of the Bambara people (30% of the population), and where 80% of the population can communicate in the language. Bambara will also be useful in Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, and Gambia. Together with Dioulé and Malinké it belongs to the Mandekan dialect family, which itself part of the Mande group, which is a Niger-Congo language subgroup.

The language is heavily influenced by French, and even the slightest knowledge of French will make it easier to remember words. If you don't remember a word you can try to use the French word.

[...]

Sunday - kari-don
Monday - nténé-don
Tuesday - tarata-don
Wednesday - araba-don
Thursday - alamisa-don
Friday - (gé)juma-don
Saturday - sibiri-don

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Jula (Dioula)
Excerpt #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyula_language
"Jula (Dyula, Dioula) is a Mande language spoken in Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, and Mali. It is one of the Manding languages, and is most closely related to Bambara, being mutually intelligible with Bambara as well as Malinke. It is a trade language in West Africa and is spoken by millions of people, either as a first or second language. It is written in the Arabic script and the Latin script, as well as in the indigenous N'Ko alphabet."...

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From https://www.ethnologue.com/language/dyu
"Jula
A language of Côte d’Ivoire

Alternate Names Dioula, Diula, Djula, Dyoula, Dyula, Jula Kong, Kong Jula, Tagboussikan

Autonym - Julakan

Population
8,500,000 in Côte d’Ivoire; Total users in all countries: 12,486,000 (as L1: 2,208,000; as L2: 10,278,000).
-snip-
"L1" = first language
"L2"- second language"

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Excerpt #3
From http://www.morethanfootprints.com/dioula-phrasebook.html

"days of the week

Monday - Tènè
Tuesday - Tarata
Wednesday - Araba
Thursday - Lamoussa
Friday - Djouma
Saturday - Sibiri
Sunday - Aty"

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Mandinka
Excerpt #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandinka_language
"The Mandinka language (Mandi'nka kango), or Mandingo, is a Mandé language spoken by the Mandinka people of the Casamance region of Senegal, the Gambia, and northern Guinea-Bissau. It is the principal language of the Gambia.

Mandinka belongs to the Manding branch of Mandé, and is thus similar to Bambara and Maninka/Malinké. In a majority of areas, it is a tonal language with two tones: low and high, although the particular variety spoken in the Gambia and Senegal borders on a pitch accent due to its proximity with non-tonal neighboring languages like Wolof.

[...]

In Senegal and Gambia, Mandinka is approaching a system of pitch accent under the influence of local non-tonal languages such as Wolof. The tonal system is more robust in Guinea-Bisau."...

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Excerpt #2
From http://mansata.wikifoundry.com/page/Learn+to+Speak+Mandinka Days of The Week / Months / Year
"Sunday - Alahadi or Dimasso
Monday - Teneng
Tuesday - Talato
Wednesday - Arabo
Thursday - Aramiso
Friday - Ajumo
Saturday - Sibiti"

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Excerpt #3
From https://mandinkakango.wordpress.com/2010/06/17/days-of-the-week/ Mandinka Days of the week
Posted June 17, 2010 by mandinka Kaŋo
"Teneŋo - Monday
Telato - Tuesday
Arabo - Wednesday
Aramiso - Thursday
Arjumo - Friday
Si bito - Saturday
Dimasso - Sunday
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Note: The term "Mandinka" (language) shouldn't be confused with the term "Maninka" (Malinké) language.
According to https://www.alsintl.com/resources/languages/Malinke/
"Malinke (also called Maninkakan Western, Maninka-Western, Malinka) is a Manding language belonging to the Niger-Congo language family. It is spoken in Eastern Senegal, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, and Mali. There are approximately 500,000 Malinke speakers total.

Malinke has a 59% lexical similarity to Mandinka."
-snip-
Help please! While I've found online information about Maninka (Malinké), I've not been able to find any internet list of the names for the days of the week in that language.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Names For Days Of The Week In Nama (Khoekhoe) Language Of South Africa, Namibia, & Botswana

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about names for days of the week in the Nama (Khoekhoe) language Of South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana.

This post also includes two YouTube videos of people speaking Nama.

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series that provides information about and lists for day names in various African languages. Click the "African languages days of the week" tag to find other posts in this ongoing series.

The content of this post is presented for linguistic, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
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Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/04/seven-videos-of-nama-stap-nama-step.html for a pancocojams post that showcases nine videos of a Nama dance form called "Nama Strap" (also known as "Nama Step" or "Riel").

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GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE NAMA LANGUAGE
Excerpt #1
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khoekhoe_language
"The Khoekhoe language... also known by the ethnic term Nama /ˈnɑːmə/[3] and formerly as Hottentot, is the most widespread of those non-Bantu languages of southern Africa that contain "click" sounds and have therefore been loosely classified as Khoisan. It belongs to the Khoe language family, and is spoken in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa by three ethnic groups, the Nama, Damara, and Haiǁom. A smaller fraction of mostly Nama and Damara who fled the 1904-1908 Namibian War of National Resistance also speak the language in Botswana, while Khoena (previously Colored) are working hard ton [sic] revive the language in South Africa.

[...]

The name for Khoekhoegowab speakers, Khoekhoen, in English khoe is a "person", with reduplication and the suffix -n to indicate the plural[citation needed]. Georg Friedrich Wreede was the first European to study the language, after arriving in Cape Town in 1659.

Khoekhoe is a national language in Namibia, where it is used for teaching up to the university level as well as in the public administration[citation needed]. In Namibia and South Africa, state-owned broadcasting corporations produce and broadcast radio programmes in Khoekhoegowab.

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Excerpt #2
From http://www.omniglot.com/writing/khoekhoe.htm
"Khoekhoe (Khoekhoegowab)

Khoekhoe is a Khoisan languages spoken by approximately 250,000 people in parts of South Africa, Botswana and Namibia. It is spoken by three ethnic groups of people: the Nama (Khoekhoen), Damar and Haiǁom, and is also known as Nama.

Khoekhoe is a national language in Nambia and is used in education at all levels, as well as on the radio. There are also Khoekhoe radio programmes in South Africa.

In the past the term Hottentot was used to refer to the Khoekhoe language and those who spoke it. This name was coined by early Dutch settlers, who, upon hearing the language spoken, thought that all the natives were saying was 'hot' and 'tot'. It is now considered rascist and is no longer used.

The first European to study the Khoekhoe language was Georg Friedricj Wreede, who arrived in Cape Town in 1659."....

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Excerpt #3
From http://www.omniglot.com/language/time/days.htm
"Khoekhoe (Nama)

Mantaxtses, ǂgurotses (Monday)
Denstaxtses, ǀgamǀîtses (Tuesday)
Wunstaxtses, !nonaǁîtses (Wednesday)

Donertaxtses, hakaǁîtses (Thursday)

Fraitaxtse, koroǁîtses (Friday)
Satertaxtses, !naniǁîtses (Saturday)
Sontaxtses, hûǁîtses (Sunday)"

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: KhoeKhoegowab Lesson No:1



Easy Languages, Uploaded on Dec 28, 2006

KhoeKhoegowab is the most populous and widespread of the Khoisan languages. It belongs to the Khoe language family, and is spoken in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa by the Namaqua, Damara, and Haillom, as well as smaller ethnic groups such as the #Khomani. The name for Nama speakers, Khoekhoen, is from the Nama word khoe "person", with reduplication and the suffix -n to indicate the plural.
Thusnelda Dausas and Gabriel /Khoeseb are two young teachers from the primery school, a small school vilage called Baumgartsbrunn in Namibia.
-snip-
Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread
Gladys Baya, 2007
"I can't even hear the diference between the four of them! :-( Next time someone tells me English sounds are difficult, I'll send them to study KhoeKhoegowab!

Thanks for the lesson!"

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pusifut, 2007
"they dont speak with the clicks because they want to, they speak because its part of their language. its just like how english speakers are perhaps one of the only peoplep to use th certain words
2007"

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Stephen Blake. 2012
"Thank you for posting these lessons. I teach high school human geography in Tennessee USA and my classes had a lot of fun trying to speak Khoisan. They asked me to find out the name and artist of that very catchy tune you play at the end. Could you please tell me if you can?
Kindest regards
Stephen"

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Reply
Easy Languages, 2012
"The name of the artist is: The Dogg
I don't remember the name of the song but you find a lot of his stuff on youtube. He is a very well know Namibian Kwaito - Style musician.

Last year he let us to make a video clip with him to advertise the idea of using digital media on internet by high school students. If you search for "The Dogg" on my channel you could see it. Most of it was done in our partner school in Windhoek.

Thank you for your interest. Namibia is unbelievable beautiful country. "

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Анастасия Юрь Ева, 2013
"Khosa and Zulu are easier, because the clicks are different and easier to make. I need a better description of how to place the tongue to make the clicks for KhoeKhoegowab."
-snip-
Another commenter wrote that the correct spelling is "Xhosa".

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Jonathan Canfield, 2016
"Those sounds are pretty hard to distinguish, for beginners. Thanks for the lesson. It was informative and clear."

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Example #2: KhoeKhoegowab Lesson No:3




Easy Languages, Uploaded on Dec 31, 2006

KhoeKhoegowab is the most populous and widespread of the Khoisan languages. It belongs to the Khoe language family, and is spoken in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa by the Namaqua, Damara, and Haillom, as well as smaller ethnic groups such as the #Khomani. The name for Nama speakers, Khoekhoen, is from the Nama word khoe "person", with reduplication and the suffix -n to indicate the plural.

Thusnelda Dausas and Gabriel /Khoeseb are two young teachers from the primery school, a small school vilage called Baumgartsbrunn in Namibia.
-snip-
Here's a comment from this video's discussion thread:
"AdmiralXolo, 2012
"Lol this is easy for Zulu and Xhosa speakers like myself.Althou we don't have as many clicks as the khoi but this is kinda fun"

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