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Saturday, April 21, 2018

Grambling State University vs. Jackson State University 2017 Marching Bands Halftime Show (with most of the selected comments from Grambling State fans)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part IV of a four part series on the rivalry between the marching bands of two Historical Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU): Grambling State University Tiger Marching Band and Jackson State University Sonic Boom Of The South Marching Band.

This post showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Grambling State University's marching band vs Jackson State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Grambling State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/2017-article-excerpt-rivalry-between.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents general information about Grambling State University and general information about Southern State University (presented in alphabetical order). This post also provides an excerpt of an article about the rivalry between these two historical Black universities' football teams and their marching bands.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/information-about-grambling-universitys.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides information about Grambling State University's marching band and presents an excerpt of a 2017 Smithsonian University article about Jackson State University's marching band.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/jackson-state-university-vsgrambling.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Jackson State University's marching band vs Grambling State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Jackson State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, linguistic, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyright remains with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to all those who are affiliated with these universities and their marching bands. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY'S MARCHING BAND
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grambling_State_University
Marching band

"GSU's [Grambling University's] World Famed Tiger Marching Band is a historic marching band with many special accolades and accomplishments. For instance, they are the only HBCU marching band in the nation to perform at two consecutive U.S. presidential inaugurations.[12] "World Famed" was founded in 1926 and serves as one of the premier ambassadors of the university. One of the band's most anticipated traditions is the annual nationally televised "Battle of The Bands" against Southern University's Human Jukebox marching band during Bayou Classic weekend in the Superdome. The yearly event attracts tens of thousands of alumni, fans, and spectators.[13]

"World Famed" is led by two drum majors and features a danceline from the university's Orchesis Dance Company."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: 2017 Grambling State World Famed Tiger Marching Band vs Jackson State



fact12, Published on Sep 17, 2017

New 2017 Grambling State World Famed Tiger Marching Band vs Jackson State Halftime Show. Watch them showcase Bobby Brown's "My Prerogative"!
-snip-
Here are selected comments from that video's discussion thread, with numbers added for referencing purposes only.

September 2017
1. Thanos The Mad Titan
"World Famed keep doing your thing! I loved this one. You'll get haters on every level, especially when you're kicking ass and taking names. Keep it up Tigers."

**
REPLY
2. Shay Thomas
"Thanos The Mad Titan thanks for the positive comment"

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REPLY
3. Jason Spalding, October 2017
"Thanos The Mad Titan it's all in fun. A little band battle it's how they have fun. People are getting to serious. Relax lol"

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4. heybeefcake
"I give the Win to GSU on this one. Great precision grill also. Both bands reminds me of the level of competition between the two program back in the 80's. Great job BOTH bands!!!"

**
5. ZN91Psi1
"Nice sound and energy GSU! Keep on doing what you do."

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6. Fredrick Martin
"GsU....hold this L......until next year....To the haters who are true die hard fans of Grambling....I feel ya...it's hard to believe it.....but we all watched this one....JSU put GSU in that freezer.... R.I.P. GSU....#noactivistneededatall"
-snip-
“hold this L” – African American Vernacular English expression from “take a L” = take a loss. (to lose; i.e. opposite of “to win”)

**
7. Ashley Thomas
"Grambling going to always represent in a respectful way and play wonderfully can't take that from them."

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8. Xtradonaire Motown
"Great show, I loved the new rollout (new coming on the field song-instead of EWF). the rapper Mic needs to be adjusted (more volume) to blend in with the Great GSU sound. Grambling is the most exciting and electrifying band in SWAC, therefore, there is no need for Grambling to imitate others-Grambling does not need individuals Band Members to dance and give a show, that's what Grambling does-which is why they stand apart from the rest...Grambling Dance & Blow all at the same time! Grambling is the only band that can give you a whole Half Time Show of Dancing & Blowing simultaneously. Grambling you don't need 5 Band members giving a show, you're not lacking. Let your compettitors do that, they need to."

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REPLY
9. superGJ24
"Thank you Mowtown i hope they are reading this and someone has the balls to boycot if this happens again"

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REPLY
10. Xtradonaire Motown
"GSU is already GREAT!!! no need for a few band members to dance, let the whole BAND DANCE as they do so well! Thank you for your support."

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11. thebaddestdiva57
"Grambling won halftime Jackson didn't do sh&t* πŸ˜•
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment in that YouTube discussion thread

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REPLY
12. Mr Banks
"thebaddestdiva57 how dey wonπŸ˜’πŸ˜’πŸ˜’"

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REPLY
13. thebaddestdiva57
"Mr Banks what did Jackson do? lol I mean I didn't see anything spectacular, Grambling actually entertained the crowd and got people out of their seats."

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REPLY
14. Michael Bembery
"I would think ...they're at their HOME field 🀦🏾‍♂️πŸ™„...but as far as band concepts ...they still have work to do compared to JSU"

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REPLY
15. thebaddestdiva57
"Michael Bembery I would think Jackson would have showed out but I was sadly disappointed. Grambling did everything right in my book, Jackson was boring"
-snip-
"showed out" is probably derived from = "showed out" from "show-off", meaning "performed spectacularly"

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REPLY
16. Michael Bembery
"thebaddestdiva57 well everybody book go by different standards...some high , some low... so hey"

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REPLY
17. woolly65
"WTF Gram is at home. In my opinion Jstate had the better show. And before anyone starts to talk smack, I am a Gram fan."

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REPLY
18. thebaddestdiva57
"woolly65 again what so special about what they did? I mean Grambling danced, played JSU song back to them, got the crowd into it. all Jackson did was play Grambling fight song and chant. Where was the entertainment?"

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REPLY
19. thebaddestdiva57
"Michael Bembery absolutely!"

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REPLY
20. Marvelle La'Rue
"thebaddestdiva57 Jsu shows just haven't nevered been so entertaining to me but i like them more in the stands than on the field. They never had that wow factor to me. Tbh Gsu always steal their crowd at their home field until they play rock the house or get ready then they start booing."

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REPLY
21. thebaddestdiva57
"Marvelle La'Rue I AGREE! I like them in the stands I have never really just looked into their half time shows but now I get it they are more of a stand band."

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REPLY
22. Marvelle La'Rue
"thebaddestdiva57 dont get it twisted the boom Got the drills the Dms and the Jsettes but them dance routines just be boring to me."

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REPLY
23. cadink1
"woolly 65. No they did not. It was not entertaining at all. Have a seat please. Now when they played in the 5th, that's a different story."

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REPLY
24. thebaddestdiva57
"Marvelle La'Rue yes I love their entrance to get ready and I get it but I just prefer seeing them in the stands than on the field 🀷🏾‍♀️"

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REPLY
25. thebaddestdiva57
"cadink1 wait which band are you referring to bc I have heard countless people say Grambling was very entertaining even Jackson State fans admitted and said they were better soooo... 🀷🏾‍♀️"

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REPLY
26. cadink1
"thebaddestdiva57 Grambling was entertaining as always. Let me go back and read my comment cause you have me bugging."
-snip-
"you have me bugging"= "You're confusing me."

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REPLY
27. cadink1
"thebaddestdiva57 Chile let me go edit my comment. I was responding to woolly65."

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REPLY
28. Marvelle La'Rue
"thebaddestdiva57 right"

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REPLY
29. thebaddestdiva57
"cadink1 lol oh no problem I was just making sure we on the same page we good ☺️"

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30. Patrice Johnson
"Not a fan of neither but jackson State won this one they had to cause TSU whoop that ass last week so they felt low and had to come after gsu"
-snip-
Several commenters in this discussion thread and in the discussion thread for Part III of this series mentioned the 2017 Tennessee State University vs Jackson State marching band halftime show. Here's a link to one video of that halftime show: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQ5NwDLStS0.

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31. Ryan Palacios
"Them boys killed it!"

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32. Jaz Klean
"Great field show tigers. Glad to see you execute precision/excellence(like we use to back the early 80's-mid 90's). Your 8-5's look wonderful. Your precision drill/step 2's/diamonds Outstanding. I could finally actually hear your articulations(been praying for this), but watch your overblowing(horns). Remember: "Execute, Don't Over Do It".
Doc Conrad Hutchinson is πŸ˜ƒ. KKPSI Fall '90"

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33. dee dixon
"sorry but yall tried it ... BOOM got yall on this way .. maybe next year ..πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ crowd was bored till the end ..."

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REPLY
34. thebaddestdiva57
"dee dixon the crowd was bored all of Jackson's field show, they didn't really do anything! Everyone on Grambling side was saying the same thing they Jackson sucked"

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35. Allen Williams
"JSU only did what they did because clearly no one was paying attention to them. The best team is GSU obvi. lol Grambling has class and doesn't have to resort to what JSU did lol."

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REPLY
36. A BandHead
"But they did. Did you watch the halftime show???"

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37. Jerald Jay Savage, October 2017
"GSU,'s side was more crunk for JSU. GSU performed like their soul was snatched. JSUs show was hard to come behind. JSU with the win. Hands down."

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38. Travis Cyprien
"Man I have to say the same after seeing JSU show. JSU came to Gramblin and played them. The come back that Gramblin did was good but it was no match to what JSU did. The Rock the house routine needs to stay with Gramblin that's where it started. JSU just copy it and made it there own"

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REPLY
39. Katrina Howard
"Travis Cyprien Yes That Rock Da House started at Gram ions ago. I liked both bands, but give the W to Gram."

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40. Michael Bembery
"So y'all gone not hear that tuba solo around 7:04 ...OKAY ...GSU keep working but let's not act like they just out did the Sonic Boom ...best show by the BOOM thus far this season and remember it's EARLY in the season."

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REPLY
41. cadink1
"Why is it so hard for you JSU folks to understand that your field shows are boring!!! Come on man. GSU knows how to engage the crowd. People look forward to the halftime shows for ENTERTAINMENT!! I'm sorry, I was not entertained."

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42. Larry Hubbard
"Both bands had very good halftime shows. I would give the W to JSU and the L to GSU. That doesn't take away from an overall great halftime show though. On a side note, as a videographer, I see a few areas where there GSU videographer could have gotten some better shots (Beginning of Rock the House makes you dizzy and around 7:45, the young lady was throwing down but went off camera). Overall as a former band member of Alcorn (late 80s, early 90s), I enjoyed both bands."

**
43. J Baker
"Please watch the JSU first because they showed out!!! I'm embarrassed to say I'm from La after GSU took that "L"."

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44. Viveca SU fan 4 life, December 2018
"I really enjoy watching this Gramble they did their thing great job"
-snip-
"SU" = Southern University

**
45. Rodney Player, March 2018
"I must admit GSU has seen better days but they do sound a little better this year than last year."

**
46. Yakita Johnson, March 2018
"Y'all only saying JSU won because of how they played Gram fight song but anybody will play anyone's fight song but JSU will NEVER beat Gram in football for the next five years #FutureGramAthlete"

****
This concludes this pancocojams series.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Jackson State University vs. Grambling State University 2017 Marching Bands Halftime Show (with most of the selected comments from JSU fans)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a four part series on the rivalry between the marching bands of two Historical Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU): Grambling State University Tiger Marching Band and Jackson State University Sonic Boom Of The South Marching Band.

This post showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Jackson State University's marching band vs Grambling State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Jackson State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/2017-article-excerpt-rivalry-between.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents general information about Grambling State University and general information about Southern State University (presented in alphabetical order). This post also provides an excerpt of an article about the rivalry between these two historical Black universities' football teams and their marching bands.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/information-about-grambling-universitys.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides information about Grambling State University's marching band and presents an excerpt of a 2017 Smithsonian University article about Jackson State University's marching band.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/grambling-state-university-vs-jackson.html for Part IV of this series. Part IV showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Grambling State University's marching band vs Jackson State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Grambling State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, linguistic, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyright remains with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to all those who are affiliated with these universities and their marching bands. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY'S SONIC BOOM OF THE SOUTH MARCHING BAND
From http://websites.one.jsums.edu/sonicboom/?page_id=515
“The “Sonic Boom” has performed many halftime appearances for the Atlanta Falcons, Detroit Lions, New Orleans Saints and Cincinnati Bengals; a television special for Motown’s 30th Anniversary and the 34th NAACP Image Awards, with a special guest performance by “Cedric the Entertainer.” The band is a favored entry in halftime performances during football season as well as for parades across Mississippi and in other states. The Jackson State University Marching Band was dubbed The Sonic Boom of the South in 1971 by students in the band. In 1974, the band’s theme, “Get Ready,” an old Motown favorite was selected and three years after that, the “Tiger Run-On” was perfected. The “Tiger Run- On” is a fast, eye-catching shuffle that blends an adagio step with an up-tempo shuffle, then back to adagio — a “Sonic Boom” trademark that brings fans to their feet during halftime performances.”

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Jackson State University vs. Grambling State University Halftime 2017



JSU Bands, Published on Sep 16, 2017
-snip-
Here are selected comments from that video's discussion thread. These comments are numbered for referencing purposes only.

In addition to the sharing this video of that halftime show itself, I'm particularly interested in documenting the use of African American Vernacular English term "[to] clown"; "clowned"", "crowning". A brief explanations of those terms is included after comment #1.

September 2017
!. Senevano
"WHO told them to CLOWN like this?!?! #Luvtheboom!!!"
-snip-
Here's a definition of "clowing" from https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=clowning
"Clowning
Clowned: - or Clowning: Also known as "To Clown" and "The Clowning" - To make fun of, to make an absolute fool of, or to school someones dumb ass.
"Remember that time you totally bought Larry Smith's house from the bank, which he lost to the bank after remortgaging it and spending all the money on booze... the house he said you could never set foot in again... MAN YOU TOTALLY CLOWNED YOUR DAD'S DUMB ASS!!"

"Man you totally clowned that guy"

"Man, you're totally clowning your dad! Hahahaha"

by BSmith XE January 20, 2014

**
2. OkaySoWhat
"i hollered like that lady did at 6:43-6:51 lmbooo"

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REPLY
3. nevano
"OkaySoWhat I damn near was myself lmao! The boom was Shady as hell! Lord, forgive me!"

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REPLY
4. Benji
"Who was that lady?!! I think her laughter just about said it all!!!"

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REPLY
5. nevano
"Benji She got a Ki out of it, for sure!!!"

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REPLY
6. Tori Carlisle
"Got me over her laughin'! This is one of the best shows I've seen from the band; great job JSU!"

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7. DeAndre Noel
"Damn Boom! Why y'all have to do World Famed like that, taking their fight song and using it against them? πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚"

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REPLY
8. cadink1
"Trust me, we weren't bothered."

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REPLY
9. DeDe Carson
"cadink1 unbothered and yet, you found your way to JSU Band's YouTube channel...bless"

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REPLY
10. cadink1
"DeDe Carson again.... unbothered"

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REPLY
11. cadink1
"DeDe Carson I love the fact that y'all have the female drum major tho."

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12. BaimaTV
"Can somebody pleeeeease give me some back story on the beef? It looks like JSU was just responding to something that Grambling initiated... What's the deal???"

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REPLY
13. Benandria Williams
"BaimaTV J-State stole "GSU rocks the house" and changed it to "JSU rocks the house." Grambling re-claimed their song, and instead of coming up with something original, JSU stole Grambling's fight song and threw in a few insults for good measure."

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REPLY
14. BaimaTV
"but did JSU steal the song that they play when they say "rocks the house"?"

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REPLY
15. Benandria Williams
"Yep. That was originally Gram's song."

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REPLY
16. BaimaTV
"Wow! Didn't know that. Learn something new everyday.. hmm."

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17. LONG JOHN SILVER
"Great field show and W.T straight grooving!!! JSU straight showed they ass in Grambling Love it!!!!! Lol"

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18. HouseOfTWIGGA
"Ohhhh this was Sooooo cold!!!"

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19. KJinTX
"No shade jsu, but I'm trying to figure out where jackson "dominated" this halftime show?? By imitating Grambling?? I get the gimmick and it's intent, but really?? I saw two great bands perform two great shows, but real talk the announcer, who did a decent job, got jsu more house than anything else. Grambling's show was very entertaining and they didn't need the announcer. I personally enjoyed both bands though. Reminded me of the 80's and 90's WF and Boom. This is our Swac conference at it's finest."

**
20. Fredrick Martin
"Now that's my Boom!!! Have fun and let loose...too much going on in the world....blow the bands out especially if our football team is gonna keep taking Ls...Make JSU Great A damn Gain......lol"

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21. tj tj
"from a jukebox alum.....Jsu did good but i think Gsu had more energy and pleased the crowd more....but good show..."
-snip-
" "The Human Jukebox" is the name of Southern University's marching band. Southern University, another Historically Black College & University (HBCU), is a noted Jackson State University's and Grambling University's marching bands and football teams.

**
22. Allen Williams
"At the end of the day GSU football team won. lol"

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23. C Plummer
"I can't lie! I love it when THEE BOOM plays "Get Ready", "We Came To Play", "...Rocks the House", and "The Show". The two (2) minutes of this show was good! NOW... Bring that energy to the BOOMBOX CLASSIC because that will make ZERO, HALF TIME, and FIFTH QUARTERS great! #JUKBOXfan

**
24. Mahthias Fountain
"JSU sound so amazing here! Nobody touching them Jsettes! They the originators of their style of dance! That drill was on point! Awesome show JSU!"

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25. insightonline
"Good Show JSU. The announcer was trying too hard, just too much. If you have a good Show and must have THAT Announcer... have him to invite the crowd to the celebration πŸŽ‰ not Open with an insult. 🀦🏽‍♂️ He was annoying and distracting. The Band worked hard. Good Show JSU"

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REPLY
26. catergory3kane
"insightonline ghetto ass announcer:"

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27. Ro Velt
"Yes JSU clowned Grambling. But never "the Jukebox"."

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28. EyeOftheTiger 901
"Yes Sonic Boom of the South!!!! Y'all didn't play with Grambling at the end!! #theeilove πŸ’™πŸ’™πŸ’™πŸ’™πŸ’™"

**
29. Bandhead09
"The Boom went down there and shook the house up baby!!!!!πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

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30. Are you Serious?
"JSU went there and took over halftime πŸ‘πŸΎ"

**
31. Jerald Jay Savage
"JSU Showed out!!!! J5 on point, head drum major is the business!!!, Settes doin they thing, band blowin. Tempo is better it brings energy... what mo can you ask for. An overall entertaining show. I loved it!!!!"

**
32. Kevin Clark
"Best show they have done in a while..Really entertaining, great music selection..And then clowned Gramblin"

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33. Packman 04
"Set Fire to that Brand New Field Boom!πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ Anytime you get a reaction like that from the crowd, you KNOW you did your Job right! #LuvDaBoom #TheeiLove Great Show"

**
34. Swagking Houston
"Packman 04 that’s so stupid what you just said JSU fans did the same thing in grambling halftime show when the played gsu rock the house #originators of the chant
Gs gs gs u u u i thought you knew bi&ch*"
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment in that YouTube discussion thread.

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35. Packman 04
"Swagking Houston We boo GSU because y'all suck. Not b/c y'all are disrespectful and marched a whole through the field. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

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36. FamousKelz82
"This was straight fire!!! I love the boom!!!"

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37. anthony mcginnis
"That was low.... going into someone house and disrespect them like that, I loved each and every minute of it"

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REPLY
38. CeddieCed
"anthony mcginnis the JSU way!!"

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39. TheChosenJamaican
"LMFAO, JSU y'all some cold MF's lol. Y'all went in and straight took a dump on their field lol. Now that's how you keep a rival alive."

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40. Amil Now
"The Sonic Boom of the South!!!!
This band never gets old, the sound and precision drilling seemed to already have a Dowell Taylors touch lol. I loved all of it, but I'm still praying for Chloe's dismissal. The only part of the show that lacked. The Jsettes used to be the highlight of every show.. Lord be a petitionπŸ™Œ"
-snip-
Here's some information about "The J-settes" from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-Setting
"The word J-Setting is an informal word or slang that means to dance like the Prancing J-Settes, the popular female dance team of the Jackson State University's Sonic Boom of the South marching band.

J-Setting has evolved to also become the name of the style of dance and dance culture that is modeled after the dance formations, movements and dress style of the "Prancing J-Settes". It originated in the late 1970s from African-Americans in the Jackson, Mississippi, area of the United States.

This dance style is characterized by a lead and follow format where one dancer initiates a series of high-energy dance moves, and the other dancers join in the movement. J-Setting features specific dance steps based on Prancing J-Settes marching techniques including the “J-Sette Walk,” the “Salt and Pepper,” the “Strut,” and the “Tip Toe”. In particular, the “Salt and Pepper” is a type of prance step for which the Prancing J-Settes are named and known. It is a high-knee lift or “high step” style of marching. Alternating legs lift with a bent knee to bring the foot up to the height of the opposite knee before returning the foot to the ground.

The JSU Prancing J-Settes typically march and perform in rows organized by height. J-Setting dancers also typically perform in a line or in multiple lines. While performing, dancers may also change dance formation similar to the way that marching bands change formation during shows on football fields.

The J-Setting style of dress is modeled after the dance uniforms of the JSU Prancing J-Settes. It normally includes a one or two piece bodysuit or form-fitting garment that covers the torso and crotch; and hosiery with knee high boots on the legs. However, other types of garments are also worn during a performance."

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REPLY
41. Hope Productions
"Amil Now Chloe will be there for at least the next 10-15 yrs! No alumni wants the job but majority supports the direction in which they are going"

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REPLY
42. Amil Now
"+Hope Images Production Highly doubt 10 more yrs. Your info is definitely opinion based, my cousin is a former Jsette and trust me, most do not support this new direction the the settes lol. That is definitely false. But I pray that she is out within 3 yrs. That's realistic"

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REPLY
43. David Christopher
"Hope Images Production why don't non of the alumni wants the job"

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REPLY
44. David Christopher
"Amil Now damn what is really going on"

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REPLY
45. Thee Antt
"David Christopher it's a really stressful job, dealing with alumni, band staff, fans, etc. the sponsor has no life outside of the school"

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46. Benjamin Moore
"Straight disrespectful. Iove it, Grambling talks a lot of mess and can't back it up. Coming from a former Ocean Of Soul member. Great show."

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REPLY
47. MICHAEL SMITH
"Benjamin Moore but they didπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚it was a good battle but jsu got booed until the tiger run on but both of their showed were awesome"

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REPLY
48. superGJ24
"Ocean of soul member yall's high school band will be here for homecoming, guess what you will be booed too"
-snip-
"Ocean of Soul" is the name for Texas Southern University's marching band. "TSU" is another Historically Black College & University.

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REPLY
49. Benjamin Moore
"When I said that it was straight disrespectful, I meant Jackson, not Grambling. I'm from New Orleans and Grambling was not one of the bands we really listened to. Not a fan of Grambling, never have never will. Good job JSU"

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50. Benji
"I done watched this thing at least 10 times this morning and its still Sweet, Short and ICE COLD! Great Show and Energy Boom!"

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51. Lenise Hines
"Me too I've rewind it back to 6:30 about 50 times. Love it!"

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52. jerZchic
"alright now boom/settes!!!! I'm feeling Dowell Tyalor/old school vibes from y'all!! keep it up!!!"

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REPLY
53. Kandie Carter
""jerZchic I said the same thing I'm feeling a old school vibe from them I love it tho they sound amazing!"

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54. Seth.N
"This Was A Good Show πŸ‘πŸΎ But JSU Stay With The Shenanigans πŸ’€"

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55. Mr Banks
"Did dem bad at da end....... Smh"

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56. MrBiggs8511
"The disrespect was real. But Grambling asked for it all week. DT return might have light a fire under the boom"

**
57. thebaddestdiva57
"Grambling crowned they ass if you ask me I don't go to neither school and however was in attendance. Grambling played more songs for their crowd and even did gsu rocks the house. Their crowd is electrifying I love the atmosphere in the hole. Good game G-Men"

**
58. Truth_be_told
"πŸ‘€daaaaaaayuuuuuuummmmm!!!! Lmfao they showed up!! And showed tf out!!!"

**
59. jbu2009
"like is said;....you shouldve got the boom while they was down....boom is back baby...great job"

**
60. Lisa Richardson, October 2017
"The young lady Drum Major is doing quite well.. Good job Boom"

**
61. butterscotchskin5, November 2017
"Straight up disrespected y'all in y'all house has a lmao"

**
62. Jermaine Knowles, November 2017
"Wooooow the disrespect..."

**
64. Chef E.Muhammad.#thenationschef, December 2017
"Straight clowned...they needed to be checked.."

**
65. John Lasker, February 2018
"This is OLD SCHOOL CLOWNING!!!"

**
66. Big Daddy 28, February 2018
"Yea they show their behinds on this one lol

**
67. beverly champion,February 2018
"Now they did that!!!! In your face!!! Go πŸ’₯ BOOM πŸ’₯!!!!!πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ˜πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ˜πŸ€—πŸ˜πŸ€—πŸ˜πŸ€—πŸ€—πŸ˜˜πŸ˜˜πŸ˜˜"

**
68. Tye Dunn, April 2018
"He said hey Grambling, who are we?? The Sonic The Sonic The Sonic The Sonic BOOOOOOM πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

****
This concludes Part III of this series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Information About Grambling University's Marching Band And An Excerpt Of Smithsonian Article About Jackson University's Marching Band

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a four part series on the rivalry between the marching bands of two Historical Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU): Grambling State University Tiger Marching Band and Jackson State University Sonic Boom Of The South Marching Band.

This post provides information about Grambling State University's marching band and presents an excerpt of a 2017 Smithsonian University article about Jackson State University's marching band.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/2017-article-excerpt-rivalry-between.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents general information about Grambling State University and general information about Southern State University (presented in alphabetical order). This post also provides an excerpt of an article about the rivalry between these two historical Black universities' football teams and their marching bands.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/jackson-state-university-vsgrambling.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Jackson State University's marching band vs Grambling State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Jackson State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/grambling-state-university-vs-jackson.html for Part IV of this series. Part IV showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Grambling State University's marching band vs Jackson State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Grambling State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

****
The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyright remains with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to all those who are affiliated with these universities and their marching bands.
Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY'S MARCHING BAND
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grambling_State_University
Marching band

"GSU's [Grambling University's] World Famed Tiger Marching Band is a historic marching band with many special accolades and accomplishments. For instance, they are the only HBCU marching band in the nation to perform at two consecutive U.S. presidential inaugurations.[12] "World Famed" was founded in 1926 and serves as one of the premier ambassadors of the university. One of the band's most anticipated traditions is the annual nationally televised "Battle of The Bands" against Southern University's Human Jukebox marching band during Bayou Classic weekend in the Superdome. The yearly event attracts tens of thousands of alumni, fans, and spectators.[13]

"World Famed" is led by two drum majors and features a danceline from the university's Orchesis Dance Company."...

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSU_Tiger_Marching_Band
"Grambling State University's marching band is officially known as the GSU Tiger Marching Band or as the Tiger Marching Band. It is often billed as the "World Famed Tiger Marching Band".[1][2][3]

Highlights
In 1967 and 1968, the band performed in Super Bowls I and II, respectively, prior to the NFL championship game being officially called The Super Bowl. Grambling's 1967 performance has been named "One of the Top 10 Super Bowl Halftime Shows" by Sports Illustrated magazine.

In 1972, the marching Tigers played in Monrovia, Liberia, at the inauguration of Liberian President William R. Tolbert.

In 1976, the GSU band performed in the first-ever Pioneer Bowl in Tokyo, Japan.

In 1977, GSU World Famed Tiger Marching Band performed in Mirage Bowl, Tokyo, Japan.

[...]

In 1998, the band was featured in Super Bowl XXXII, alongside Boyz II Men, Martha Reeves and Smokey Robinson.

In 1981, the band appeared in "Marching Band/Coke Is It," an award-winning television commercial developed for Coca-Cola USA by Burrell Communications Group.

In 1982, Grambling State University World Famed Tiger Marching Band was Special Guest to the Emperor of Japan, perform in Osaka, Japan and half-time performers at the Tokyo, Japan Mirage Bowl game.

[...]

In 2006, "Season of the Tiger," a six-part docudrama aired, following members of the Grambling State University (LA) marching band and football team during the 2005-2006 football season. Produced by DAFT films and Black Entertainment Television (BET), "Season of the Tiger" was the second BET reality show to focus on life at a historically black institution (HBCU), and the first to highlight the competitive environment of marching bands at some HBCUs.

In 2007, the band performed in the award-winning Denzel Washington film, The Great Debators.

In 2009, GSU World Famed Tiger Marching Band was included in the inaugural parade for U.S. President Barack Obama.[4]

In the 118th Tournament of Roses Parade (2007), Grambling State's marching band was the marching band in the Star Wars Spectacular, in which all members were wearing Imperial officer uniforms. This was the band's second time in the Tournament of Roses Parade: 1980 being the first time an HBCU band was selected to march and lead in the Tournament of Roses Parade.

[...]

In 2013, the band was included in the second inaugural parade for U.S. President Barack Obama.[6]

In 2016, Vice Media released a documentary covering the significance of GSU's marching band and the popularity of the annual battle against Southern University's Human Jukebox in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.[8]

[...]

The Tiger Marching Band have an average of 160 students with a grade points average of 3.00 or higher each year."

****
EXCERPT FROM 2017 ARTICLE: MARCH TO THE JOYOUS, RAUCOUS BEAT OF THE SONIC BOOM OF THE SOUTH
From https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/march-joyous-raucous-beat-sonic-boom-south-180961436/ March to the Joyous, Raucous Beat of the Sonic Boom of the South
College football seasons come and go, but the joyous thunder of Jackson State’s iconic marching band rolls on
By Richard Grant, Photographs by Zack Arias, January 2017
“It takes two charter planes to move the Sonic Boom of the South from its home in Jackson, Mississippi, to the first event of the season, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The 230 musicians are traveling with four band directors, support and medical staff, a security detail, a social media and video unit, cheerleaders and a team of swivel-hipped female dancers called the Prancing J-Settes.

The Sonic Boom of the South is the marching band of Jackson State University, and a leading exponent of the high-stepping, high-energy, razzle-dazzle style that has developed in historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the Deep South. Known as “show style,” it combines the military marching band tradition with funky syncopated rhythms and elements of jazz, R&B, pop and hip-hop. The bands play with tremendous power and incorporate tightly choreographed dance routines into elaborate field drills. This unique American art form has honed and perfected itself over many decades and is now breaking through into wider cultural prominence.

[...]

“We don’t have the very best musicians, or the most precise drill formations,” says O’Neill Sanford, the director of bands at Jackson State. “But no one else can bring the same energy and showmanship, and electrify a crowd of 110,000 people like we can,” he says. “That’s what everyone wants to see.”

[...]

The 100-plus members of the [University Of Nevada, Las Vegas] marching band are getting into their uniforms behind the stadium, looking very casual and relaxed, when the Sonic Boom’s mighty drums start up across the parking lot. The vibrations from the big, heavy bass drums, nine in all, are so powerful that they set off a car alarm 70 yards away. The snares sound like rattling machine-gun fire. “Holy s---,” says a big UNLV tuba player, scrambling to put on the rest of his uniform.

Then the long, gleaming procession comes into view, all polished brass, swaying helmet plumes, and flashy blue-and-white uniforms. The percussionists have dyed their tongues blue with Kool-Aid and candy (an old tradition) and many of them have a fierce, warlike expression on their faces as they march past the stunned, half-dressed UNLV band members.

Leading the Boom are four lean, handsome, high-strutting drum majors in massive, plumed shako hats, coursing with so much energy that it seems their bodies can barely contain it. Their names are Joe “Rogue Dynasty” Williams III, Abraham “The Prototype” Duffie, Tyler “Mr. Blue Phi” Battle and Giann “Mr. 704” Soto. On the Jackson State campus, their social status eclipses that of any athlete. Celebrated for their dancing skills and showmanship, the drum majors also have a vital leadership role in the band, acting as field commanders for the band directors.

“We’re a paramilitary organization with tight discipline and a chain of command,” says Williams. “We can also make a whole stadium get up and feel good.

[...]

Behind the drum majors, swinging their hips and smiling, are ten young women known as the Prancing J-Settes. They’re wearing silver boots, blue-and-silver capes, and showgirl leotards with sequins and tassels. Nicknamed “The Thrill of a Million Eyes,” the J-Settes were recently voted the best female danceline of all the historically black college marching bands.

These dancelines developed out of the drum majorette tradition. They gave up batons to concentrate on dance. The J-Settes have a wide repertoire of moves, ranging from elegant interpretations of symphonic music to high-speed booty-shaking and go-go routines. They claim to have pioneered a raunchy pelvic thrusting move known as “bucking” that has since become widespread in dancelines.

In the Las Vegas crowd of 18,575 are a few hundred alumni from historically black colleges. They wear the names of alma maters on caps and T-shirts—Jackson State, Alcorn State, Grambling State, Mississippi Valley State, Tennessee State and a few others. Jermaine Rimmey went to Southern University in Baton Rouge and now lives in Las Vegas. “Jackson State are our biggest rivals, but I’m cheering for them today,” he says. “I can cook my Louisiana food out here, but I get homesick for bands and band culture.”

Asked to describe that culture, he says, “I hate to bring race into it, but at a predominantly white game, people leave their seats at halftime and get a hot dog or whatever. At an HBCU game, nobody leaves at halftime, because that’s when the bands come on. We support our football teams, but the rivalry, the excitement, the arguing and talking smack, it’s all about the bands.”

On YouTube, and at websites like BandHead.org and HBCUdigital.com, Rimmey follows all the marching bands in the Southwestern Athletic Conference, or SWAC, which extends from Alabama to East Texas and is famous for its show-style bands. Florida A&M (FAMU), outside the SWAC, is the biggest and most famous band of all, says Rimmey, but it still hasn’t recovered from the 2011 hazing death of drum major Robert Champion, and the suspension that followed. (As a pledge, Champion was required to run down the center of a bus while being punched, kicked and assaulted by more senior band members, and he died from the blows. Following that incident, HBCUs have cracked down on the hazing traditions in their marching bands.)

As Rimmey and his friends wait for halftime, they watch and groan as the Jackson State Tigers get demolished on the football field by the UNLV Rebels. At halftime, the score is 42-10. The stadium announcer warns the fans against leaving their seats, because of the special show coming up, “with one of the best marching bands in the land.”

The UNLV band comes out first, marching corps-style. They play a cheesy old polka known as “The Chicken Song,” and do a little leg kick move when they go into “YMCA” by the Village People. The drum majorettes catch their batons, the band doesn’t make any mistakes, but by HBCU standards, it looks almost incredibly lame and lackluster.

The Sonic Boom, with double the numbers, lines up in crisp ranks at one end of the field. The drum majors stand to attention around the 20-yard line, then whistle, chant and swing their long maces over their heads. Suddenly the entire band is racing with a high-speed shuffle step, dizzying the eye by going in two directions at once and changing speeds, and then forming eight long straight lines that re-form as diagonals. This is the famous Tiger Run-On, and the Vegas crowd goes wild for it.

[...]

The origins of African-American marching bands can be traced back to the black regimental bands in the Union Army, and the brass bands that emerged in New Orleans after the Civil War. In the same postwar era, the first colleges and universities for African-Americans were created. From the earliest days of their existence, according to marching band historian William D. Lewis, black colleges and universities took great pride in their music and band programs, and played music in both the European and the vernacular American tradition.

The high-stepping pageantry of the modern show-style band seems to have evolved during practice sessions at Florida A&M University in 1946, under the band director William Foster. “We were just doing steps and high-knee lifts, and people thought that was the greatest thing on earth,” he once recalled. “I had a physical education teacher to help with the choreography, putting the steps to music...very shortly afterwards, other bands started doing it.”

At Jackson State, the seminal figure was the dapper William W. Davis, whose portrait hangs in two places today in the trophy-stuffed music building. An ex-Army bandsman, he went on to arrange music and play trumpet in Cab Calloway’s orchestra, before becoming JSU’s first band director, in 1948. Davis introduced jazz rhythms and Calloway-style showmanship to the 20-odd students in the marching band. By 1963, the band had swelled to 88 members, and they were playing Count Basie and Duke Ellington arrangements at football games.

In 1971, Davis was succeeded by Harold Haughton, who adopted the name Sonic Boom of the South, created the Tiger Run-On, and boosted the musicians to 160. “Marching bands were a big thing at HBCUs in the 1970s, but the real competitiveness was about football back then,” says Sanford. White universities in the South were very reluctant to recruit black athletes, so historically black schools were fielding football greats like Walter Payton, who played for Jackson State. Jerry Rice, the Hall of Fame wide receiver, played his college ball at a small HBCU called Mississippi Valley State University, from 1981 to 1984.

“During the 1980s, white colleges started letting black athletes in, and after that, they always took our best players away from us,” says Sanford. “People got fed up with it, the standard of football went down, and the emphasis switched to bands. No one wanted to take our musicians.”

[...]

Jarrett Carter Sr., founding editor of HBCUdigest.com, wants to know why historically black schools haven’t managed to monetize their marching bands, at a time when they’ve never been more popular. The main problem, as he identifies it, is that social media is the primary venue for this popularity. YouTube, Facebook, Snapchat and other companies are displaying band videos without paying for them and hogging the advertising income they generate.

Carter notes that HBCU bands have played Super Bowl halftimes and appeared in pop videos and reality shows. They were celebrated in the 2002 movie Drumline, which overcame a clunky story line to earn $56 million at the U.S. box office. Florida A&M was one of some 90 groups that marched in President Obama’s 2009 inaugural parade. Despite all this exposure, he writes, “many of these schools face dire economic straits.” He calls for HBCUs to get sponsors’ logos on band uniforms, sell paraphernalia, professionalize video production and start treating their bands as a valuable product with “hundreds of thousands of brand-loyal consumers.” Sanford strongly agrees. “Marching bands are a great public relations tool, but they’re also capable of generating serious financial resources. That’s what we need to start thinking about.”

****
This concludes Part II of this pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

2017 Article Excerpt: The Rivalry Between Grambling State University & Jackson State University Football Teams & Marching Bands

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a four part series on the rivalry between the marching bands of two Historical Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU): Grambling State University Tiger Marching Band and Jackson State University Sonic Boom Of The South Marching Band.

This post presents general information about Grambling State University and general information about Southern State University (presented in alphabetical order). This post also provides an excerpt of an article about the rivalry between these two historical Black universities' football teams and their marching bands.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/information-about-grambling-universitys.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides information about Grambling State University's marching band and presents an excerpt of a 2017 Smithsonian University article about Jackson State University's marching band.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/jackson-state-university-vsgrambling.html for Part III of this series. Part III showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Jackson State University's marching band vs Grambling State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Jackson State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/grambling-state-university-vs-jackson.html for Part IV of this series. Part IV showcases a YouTube video of the 2017 halftime show between Grambling State University's marching band vs Jackson State University's marching band (from the perspective of a Grambling State videographer). Selected comments from this video's discussion thread are also included in this post.

****
The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyright remains with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to all those who are affiliated with these universities and their marching bands.
Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT GRAMBLING STATE UNIVERSITY
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grambling_State_University
"Grambling State University (GSU) is a historically black, public, coeducational university, in Grambling, Louisiana. The university is home of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum and is listed on the Louisiana African American Heritage Trail. The university is a member-school of the University of Louisiana System and Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

Grambling State's athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are known as the Grambling State Tigers. The university is a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC).

[...]

Grambling State was founded in 1901 and accredited in 1949. The school became Grambling College in 1946 named after a white sawmill owner, Judson H. Grambling, who donated a parcel of land for the school to be constructed. With the addition of graduate departments, Grambling gained university status in 1974. Grambling State University emerged from the desire of African-American farmers in rural north Louisiana who wanted to educate other African Americans in the northern part of the state. In 1896, the North Louisiana Colored Agriculture Relief Association was formed to organize and operate a school. After opening a small school west of what is now the town of Grambling, the Association requested assistance from Booker T. Washington of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Charles P. Adams, sent to aid the group in organizing an industrial school, became its founder and first president.

[...]

Student life
Athletics
The Grambling Tigers represent Grambling State University in NCAA intercollegiate athletics. Grambling's sports teams participate in NCAA Division I (Football Championship Subdivision for football) in the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC). Currently, the Grambling State University Department of Athletics sponsors Men's Intercollegiate football, along with men's and women's basketball, baseball, track & field, softball, golf, soccer, tennis, bowling and volleyball.

Grambling State's long held rivals are their south Louisiana foe Southern, Prairie View A&M, and Texas Southern."....

****
INFORMATION ABOUT JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_State_University
"Jackson State University (Jackson State or JSU) is a historically Black college and university ("HBCU") in Jackson, Mississippi, United States. It was founded during the Reconstruction era in 1877 in Natchez, Mississippi, as Natchez Seminary by the American Baptist Home Mission Society of New York City. The Society moved the school to the capital, Jackson, in 1882, renaming it Jackson College. It developed its present campus in 1902.

It became a state-supported public institution in 1940. The university is a member of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Under the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, Jackson State University is classified as a research university with high research activity.[3] In the fall of 2015, Jackson State University reached a student population of nearly 10,000 students, an increase of 11% since fall 2012. The university is one of the largest HBCUs in the nation and the fourth largest university in Mississippi.[4]

Jackson State University's athletic teams, the Tigers, participate in NCAA Division I athletics as a member of the SWAC. The university is home to the Sonic Boom of the South, one of the most prominent marching bands in the nation.

[...]

Athletics
Athletic teams are a member of the NCAA Division I-FCS (Football Championship Subdivision) Southwestern Athletic Conference, commonly known as the SWAC. All SWAC sports are DI with Football being FCS. Currently, the university fields teams in men's and women's basketball, baseball, softball, golf, tennis, soccer, and bowling; women's volleyball; and men's football. The university's mascot is the Tiger, and the teams are sometimes referred to as the "Blue Bengals."

The Tiger men's football team has a heralded history, winning and sharing 16 SWAC titles, including 2007.[18] Its most famous alumni includes Pro Football Hall of Famers Lem Barney, Jackie Slater and Walter Payton, and former Jacksonville Jaguars wide receiver Jimmy Smith. Former NFL wide-receiver, five-time Pro Bowler and Jackson State alumnus Harold Jackson, served as head football in 2014 and 2015.

JSU's well-known rivals include Southern, Alcorn State, Mississippi Valley State, Tennessee State, and Texas Southern.


Sonic Boom of the South
The band was organized in the early 1940s. As early as the mid-1920s, the University had a well-organized orchestra. The group was given the nickname "The Sonic Boom of the South" by band director Harold J. Haughton Sr. in 1971. In 1971, the majorettes abandoned their batons and became a dance team known as the Prancing J-Settes, also named by Haughton. In 1974, "Get Ready", an old Motown favorite, was selected as the band's theme song. Also, during the mid-1970s, the "Tiger Run-On" was perfected. Created by Haughton, the "Tiger Run-On" is a fast, eye-catching shuffle step that blends an adagio step with an up-tempo shuffle (200 steps per minute), then back to adagio—a Sonic Boom trademark that brings fans to their feet during halftime performances. In October 1990, under the direction of Dowell Taylor and staff, five Sonic Boom of the South performed in Los Angeles, California, for Motown 30-What's Going on. This was the event that first drew national attention to the Sonic Boom.

The Sonic Boom of the South is led by five drum majors collectively referred to as the "Jackson Five" or "J-5" for short."....

****
ARTICLE EXCERPT: JACKSON STATE AT GRAMBLING IS A RETURN TO A FAMILIAR AND HEATED RIVALRY
From https://theundefeated.com/features/hbcu-jackson-state-grambling-familiar-and-heated-rivalry/ Jackson State at Grambling is a return to a familiar and heated rivalry

After 5 years, game is back at Grambling after ’12 boycott canceled JSU’s homecoming game
BY MINIYA SHABAZZ. September 16, 2017
"On Saturday, Grambling State University and Jackson State University will face off at Eddie Robinson Stadium in Grambling, Louisiana, for the first time in five years — or since GSU boycotted the Tigers’ 2012 homecoming game.

The boycott in 2013 generated national attention. The Grambling players refused to play at Jackson State’s homecoming game because of poor facilities at their own school in addition to tiresome and lengthy road trips before games. The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) fined GSU and mandated that the school travel to Jackson State to play for the next three seasons.

[...]

Saturday’s game is not a conference game. The SWAC has changed the number of conference games from nine to seven. Because of this new rule, Grambling and Jackson State were not regularly scheduled to play each other, but neither school wanted to miss out on the historic rivalry game. Another advantage to having this game is that Jackson State fans travel well. ESPN reported that 21,000 attended the JSU vs. GSU game in 2011. As of Friday morning, GSU had sold 6,200 tickets.

Legendary Grambling quarterback and former head coach Doug Williams thinks the Southern University Jaguars are the Tigers’ chief rival this season, followed by Jackson State and Alcorn State.
“From the time before I played in the SWAC at Grambling and even when I’m gone, Grambling and Jackson have always been a rivalry and will always be a rivalry because the way they play,” said Williams, who also happens to be an NFL Super Bowl-winning quarterback.

[...]

Grambling president Richard Gallot is hyped now that Jackson State is back on GSU soil with new stadium upgrades that cost more than $2 million....

“This is a rivalry that has been ongoing for many, many years, so this gives us the opportunity to really put all of that behind us, and this is a clear sign that we have moved beyond that period of time,” said Gallot.

High School Day is another event occurring Saturday that is expected to have more than 2,000 high school students, staff and parents in attendance for the Gramfam experience. The theme for the day is “Stomp the Yard.”

[...]

And those students will also get to see legendary bands perform at halftime and the 5th Quarter: the World Famed Tiger Marching Band, with GSU’s Orchesis dancers, and the Jackson State Sonic Boom of the South.”…

****
This concludes Part I of this pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.